Products and Resources

This page lists products and resources available from the Communication and Conflict website.


CAOS Conflict Coaching Clients handbook

Purchase the CAOC Conflict Coaching Client's Handbook for £4 via the purchase button below: 

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CAOS Effective Communication for Conflict Resolution. Workplace Mediation

A Guide to Effective Communication for Conflict Resolution introduces the 9 Principles that are also described on this site to help the reader develop a 'mindfulness' in relation to their communication in a way that supports the resolution of conflict. In this book 

Alan shares his observations and learnings from working as a Mediator and Conflict Coach with regard to the ways that people become stuck in unresolved conflict but also how they go on to create more effective ways forward in their difficult situations. 

"I think you put together so well all the essential components of
conflict transformation in a way which people can relate to and
understand. A brilliant book and I will recommend it to everyone."  

Jo Berry  - BuildingBridgesForPeace.org


Resolving workplace bullying allegations. Workplace Mediation.

Purchase the book on Amazon in Kindle or Paperback: How to Resolve Bullying in the Workplace : Stepping out of the Circle of Blame to Create an Effective Outcome for All.

From Chapter 1 in the book 'How to Resolve Bullying in the Workplace': 

"The problem with bullying in the workplace is that traditional responses to allegations that it is happening require the person who feels bullied and anyone who is helping them with their concerns to ‘Prove it!’. 

While those who feel bullied may see their experience as ‘obviously bullying’, there will be others who do not, including of course the person who they consider to be ‘the bully’.  This expectation of proof of bullying becomes an immediate obstacle in moving forward in any difficult situation or relationship in the workplace. 

The various definitions of bullying that can be found in dictionaries or guidelines or in articles online and in the printed press read as if they are very clear. But when used as a basis for assessing whether bullying has taken place they are ambiguously interpreted because of the subjectivity of the perceptions of those involved. 

.........This is the bad news in relation to bullying. From the very start of any procedure designed to ‘tackle’ it by proving it has occurred there is ambiguity for anyone involved, whether the person who feels bullied, the person they see as ‘the bully’ or any managers or Human Resources officers who are required to deal with it.

The consequence of this is a circle of finger-pointing - blame and accusations and counter-accusations of bullying, incompetence, conspiracy, lack of care, burying of heads in the sand and so very little change, if any, occurs in the majority of cases where bullying is alleged.


..........But within this recognition of the ineffectiveness of proving bullying has occurred resides the possibility for breaking out of the circle of blame and accusations that lead to dissatisfaction all round the circle. This possibility is available to all involved in such situations if they are able to do one thing:

To let go of the focus on ‘bullying’!

As I will discuss in the next chapter, the ways in which I have seen people resolve workplace disputes where originally there have been accusations of bullying and harassment have been where the term ‘bullying’ retreats from the discussion.

When this happens, a more useful, detailed discussion relevant to the unique circumstances and perceptions of those involved can occur, enabling, and expecting them to create their own answers to their difficult working relationship."


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